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Enterprise Identity Theft Risks for 2010

By Robert Siciliano, ID Theft Expert

Jan 24, 2010 - Advancements in technology over the past decade have created a tremendous amount of opportunity for the savvy businessperson.

Whether it's mobility, streamlined processes, marketing, or the ability to sell to a global market, there's never been a better time to be in business.

Like anything good, there is always a negative.

While there are certainly many negatives in technology, like the headaches when something doesn't work correctly and the constant learning curve we must all endure, the biggest negative is security issues.

So for the SMB (that's you, the savvy businessperson), here are ten considerations for the new decade:

Back up your back up. Numerous reports of cyber-war, thousands of new viruses weekly, and even Mother Nature reeking havoc on the Internet, have caused concern among industry professionals.

Doing business in the cloud is fantastic; however, make sure you have redundant local backups of your data.

Anti-virus will not fully protect you. The sheer volume of attacks and new viruses created will keep the anti-virus vendors busy. But there is no way they can keep up the pace 100% of the time.

There are numerous technologies that will immunize your PC and make whatever virus or spyware impotent, and any data on your machine typed in a browser useless to the thief.

Social media identity theft is the act of creating a blog or social media site that models your day to day operations.

At any time someone can register domains or social media sites with your brand as the face. They then sell product that they never ship and/or do things to damage your brand. Scoop up your social media identities with Knowem.com

Social network nitwits. One of the easiest ways into your companies' networks is via social media.

The explosion of "I just made a tuna" communications has brought out the dumb in many people.

The simple act of setting up a group on Facebook and getting your employees to join can open up a treasure trove of data that can facilitate social engineering attacks. Create policies and procedures that involve appropriate use.

Social engineering, the ruse of a confidence man, is back in full force. It never really went away, but with the amount of security in place, sometimes the path of least resistance is simply asking your cleaning crew for the keys to the building.



 

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