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Enabling Risk Based IT Gov

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A Breach Prevention Plan

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Best Practices for eGRC

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The Elements of Privacy Risk

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KuppingerCole
KuppingerCole News

  • KuppingerCole Analysts' View on Operational Technology / Industry 4.0

    Industry 4.0 is the German government’s strategy to promote the computerization of the manufacturing industry. This strategy foresees that industrial production in the future will be based on highly flexible mass production processes that allow rich customization of products. This future will also include the extensive integration of customers and business partners to provide business and value-added processes. It will link production with high-quality services to create so-called “hybrid products”.



  • The need for an "integrated identity" within hybrid cloud infrastructures

    by Matthias Reinwarth

    Yes, you might have heard it in many places: "Cloud is the new normal". And this is surely true for many modern organisations, especially start-ups or companies doing all or parts of their native business within the cloud. But for many other organisations this new normal is only one half of normal.

    A lot of enterprises currently going through the process of digital transformation are maintaining their own infrastructure on premises and are looking into extending their business into the cloud. This might be done for various reasons, for example for the easier creation of infrastructure allowing rapid scalability and the ability to replace costly infrastructure which is not mission-critical to be implemented within the traditional organisational perimeter.

    For many organisations it is simply not an option to move completely to the cloud for various good reasons including the protection of intellectual property within the traditional infrastructure or the necessity to maintain legacy infrastructure which in turn is business critical. For this type of enterprises, typically large and with a decent history regarding their IT, of which many are in highly regulated sectors, the future infrastructure paradigm has to be the hybrid cloud, at least for the near or medium-term future.

    Cloud service providers are required to offer standardized technological approaches for this type of customers. A seamless, strategic approach to extending the existing on-premises infrastructure into the cloud is an important prerequisite for this type of customers. This is true for the actual network connectivity basis and it is especially true for the administration, the operation and the security aspects of modern IT infrastructures.

    For every company that already has a well-defined IAM/IAG infrastructure and the relevant maintenance and governance processes in place it is essential that Identity Management for and within the cloud is well integrated into the existing processes. Many successful, corporate IAM systems build upon the fact, that enterprise–internal data silos have been broken up and have been integrated into an overall identity and Access Management system. For the maintenance of the newly designed cloud infrastructure it obviously does not make any sense to create a new silo of identity information for the cloud. Maintaining technical and business accounts for cloud usage is in the end a traditional identity management task. Designing the appropriate entitlement structure and assigning the appropriate access rights to the right people within the cloud while adhering to best practice like the least privilege principle is in the end a traditional Access Management task. Defining, implementing and enforcing appropriate processes to control and govern assigned access rights to identities across a hybrid infrastructure are in the end traditional access governance and access intelligence tasks.

    Providers of traditional, on premises IAM infrastructures and cloud service providers alike have to support this class of customer organisations to fulfil their hybrid security and hence their IAM/IAG needs. CSPs like Amazon Web Services embrace this hybrid market by providing overall strategies for hybrid cloud infrastructures including a suitable identity, access and security approach. The implementation of a concept for an "integrated identity" across all platforms, be they cloud or on premises, is therefore a fundamental requirement. Leveraging mechanisms like inbound and outbound federation, the deployment of open standards like SAML 2.0, the availability of APIs for integrative access to the AWS IAM/IAG functionality and the integration of existing policies into the AWS IAM policies implemented as JSON files are important steps towards this "integrated identity". For the access intelligence and access governance side the AWS CloudTrail component can provide detailed logs down to an API-call-per-user-level for the existing cloud infrastructure. Such extensive logs can then be evaluated by means of an existing Access Intelligence, an existing Real-Time Security Intelligence (RTSI) solution or by deploying the AWS analytics mechanisms like Lambda.

    It is obvious that these are "only" building blocks for solutions, not a fully designed solution architecture. But we're one step closer to the design and implementation for an appropriate solution for each individual enterprise. Covering all relevant aspects of security and IT GRC inside and outside the cloud will be one key challenge for the deployment of cloud infrastructures for this type of organisations.

    Hybrid architectures might not be the final target architecture for some organisations, but for the next years they will form an important deployment scenario for many large organisations. Vendors and implementation partners alike have to make sure that easily deployable, standardised mechanisms are in place to extend an existing on-premises IAM seamlessly into the cloud, providing the required levels of security and governance. And since we are talking about standards and integration: This will have to work seamlessly for other, probably upcoming types of architectures as well, e.g. for those where the step towards cloud based IAM systems deploying Azure Active Directory has already been taken.



  • Executive View: VMWare vCloud® Air™ – Security and Assurance - 71286

    by Mike Small

    This report provides an overview of VMWare vCloud Air Infrastructure as a Service together with an assessment of the security and assurance provided in respect of five critical risks faced by a cloud customer.

  • Controlling and Monitoring Administrative Access to Enterprise IT
    Managing and monitoring privileged access to Enterprise Systems has turned out to be one of the most important aspects of IT security for almost any type of organization.



  • Beyond Database Security: Adaptive, Policy-Based Access Control for Dynamic Data Filtering and Data Masking
    Controlling access to databases can be anything between complex, performance-breaking and not fine-grained enough. In this webinar we will explore new approaches to this challenge and how they tackle frequent performance and security issues.



  • From Hybrid Cloud to Standard IT?

    by Mike Small

    I have recently heard from a number of cloud service providers (CSP) telling me about their support for a “hybrid” cloud. What is the hybrid cloud and why is it important? What enterprise customers are looking for is a “Standard IT” that would allow them to deploy their applications flexibly wherever is best. The Hybrid Cloud concept goes some way towards this.

    There is still some confusion about the terminology that surrounds cloud computing and so let us go back to basics. The generally accepted definition of cloud terminology is in NIST SP-800-145. According to this there are three service models and four deployment models. The service models being IaaS, PaaS and SaaS. The four deployment models for cloud computing are: Public Cloud, Private Cloud, Community Cloud and Hybrid Cloud. So “Hybrid” is related to the way cloud services are deployed. The NIST definition of the Hybrid Cloud is:

    “The cloud infrastructure is a composition of two or more distinct cloud infrastructures (private, community, or public) that remain unique entities, but are bound together by standardized or proprietary technology that enables data and application portability (e.g., cloud bursting for load balancing between clouds).”

    However sometimes Hybrid is used to describe a cloud strategy – meaning that the organization using the cloud will use cloud services for some kinds of application but not for others. This is a perfectly reasonable strategy but not quite in line with the above definition. So I refer to this as a Hybrid Cloud Strategy.

    In fact this leads us on to the reality for most enterprises is that the cloud is just another way of obtaining some of their IT services. Cloud services may be the ideal solution for development because of the speed with which they can be obtained. They may be good for customer interaction services because of their scalability. They may be the best way to perform data analytics needing the occasional burst of very high performance computing. Hence, to the enterprise, the cloud becomes another added complexity in their already complex IT environment.

    So the CSPs have recognised that in order to tempt the enterprises to use their cloud services they need recognise this complexity challenge that enterprises face and provide help to solve it. So the “Hybrid” cloud that will be attractive to enterprises needs to:

    * Enable the customer to easily migrate some parts of their workload and data to a cloud service. This is because there may be some data that is required to remain on premise for compliance or audit reasons.

    * Orchestrate the end to end processing which may involve on premise as well as services from other cloud providers.

    * Allow the customer to assure the end to end security and compliance for their workload.

    When you look at these requirements it becomes clear that standards are going to be a key component to allow this degree of flexibility and interoperability. The standards needed go beyond the support for Hypervisors, Operating Systems, Databases and middleware to include the

    deployment, management and security of workloads in a common way across on premise and cloud deployments as well as between cloud services from different vendors.

    There is no clear winner in the standards yet – although OpenStack has wide support including from IBM, HP and Rackspace – but one of the challenges is that vendors offer versions of this with their own proprietary additions. Other important vendors have their own proprietary offerings that they would like customers to adopt including AWS, Microsoft and VMWare. So the game is not over yet, but the industry should recognize that the real requirement is for a “Standard IT” that can easily be deployed in whatever way is most appropriate at any given time.



  • How to Cope with Challenging Identities in a Converged World
    Over the past years the term of the Identity Explosion, depicting the exponential growth of identities organizations have to deal with, raised. We introduced the need for a new ABC: Agile Business, Connected. While agility is a key business requirement, connected organizations are a consequence of both the digital transformation of business and of mobility and IoT. This rapid evolution in consequence means that we also have to transform our understanding of identities and access.



  • Best Practice: European Identity Award 2015: NORD/LB - 71401

    by Matthias Reinwarth

    EIC Award 2015 for Best Access Governance / Access Intelligence Project: Implementation of a large-scale, state-of-the-art Access Management and Access Governance project improving the bank’s compliance and efficiency while transitioning to “IAM as a Service” as a modern Business Process Outsourcing model. 



  • Mit Active Directory zu sicherer Zugriffskontrolle für das Digitale Business
    „Identität ist der neue Perimeter“ und „Identity und Access Management/Governance sind das Fundament für die Sicherheit des digitalen Unternehmens“ – so könnte man die Trends der kürzlich in München zu Ende gegangenen European Identity & Cloud Conference 2015 (EIC) zusammenfassen.



  • Why Cybersecurity and Politics Just Don’t Mix Well

    by Alexei Balaganski

    With the number of high-profile security breaches growing rapidly, more and more large corporations, media outlets and even government organizations are falling victim to hacking attacks. These attacks are almost always widely publicized, adding insult to already substantial injury for the victims. It’s no surprise that the recent news and developments in the field of cybersecurity are now closely followed and discussed not just by IT experts, but by the general public around the world.

    Inevitably, just like any other sensational topic, cybersecurity has attracted politicians. And whenever politics and technology are brought together, the resulting mix of macabre and comedy is so potent that it will make every security expert cringe. Let’s just have a look at the few of the most recent examples.

    After the notorious hack of Sony Pictures Entertainment last November, which was supposedly carried out by a group of hackers demanding not to release a comedy movie about a plot to assassinate Kim Jong-Un, United States intelligence agencies were quick to allege that the attack was sponsored by North Korea. For some time, it was strongly debated whether a cyber-attack constitutes an act of war and whether the US should retaliate with real weapons.

    Now, every information security expert knows that attributing hacking attacks is a long and painstaking process. In fact, the only known case of a cyber-attack more or less reliably attributed to a state agency until now is Stuxnet, which after several years of research has been found out to be a product of US and Israeli intelligence teams. In case of the Sony hack, many security researchers around the world have pointed out that it was most probably an insider job having no relation to North Korea at all. Fortunately, cool heads in the US military have prevailed, but the thought that next time such an attack can be quickly attributed to a nation without nuclear weapons is still quite chilling…

    Another repercussion of the Sony hack has been the ongoing debate about the latest cybersecurity ‘solutions’ the US and UK governments have come up with this January. Among other crazy ideas, these proposals include introducing mandatory backdoors into every security tool and banning certain types of encryption completely. Needless to say, all this is served under the pretext of fighting terrorism and organized crime, but is in fact aimed at further expanding government capabilities of spying on their own citizens.

    Unfortunately, just like any other technology plan devised by politicians, it won’t just not work, but will have disastrous consequences for the whole society, including ruining people’s privacy, making every company’s IT infrastructure more vulnerable to hacking attacks (exploiting the same government-mandated backdoors), blocking significant part of academic research, not to mention completely destroying businesses like security software vendors or cloud service providers. Sadly, even in Germany, the country where privacy is considered an almost sacred right, the government is engaged in similar activities as well.

    Speaking about Germany, the latest, somewhat more lighthearted example of politicians’ inability to cope with cybersecurity comes from the Bundestag, the German federal parliament. After another crippling cyber-attack on its network in May, which allowed hackers to steal large amount of data and led to a partial shutdown of the network, the head of Germany’s Federal Office for Information Security has come up with a great idea. Citing concerns for mysterious Russian hackers still lurking in the network, it has been announced that the existing infrastructure including over 20,000 computers has to be completely replaced. Leaving aside the obvious question – are the same people that designed the old network really able to come up with a more secure one this time? – one still cannot but wonder whether millions needed for such an upgrade could be better spent somewhere else. In fact, my first thought after reading the news was about President Erdogan’s new palace in Turkey. Apparently, he just had to move to a new 1,150-room presidential palace simply because the old one was infested by cockroaches. It was very heartwarming to hear the same kind of reasoning from a German politician.

    Still, any security expert cannot but continue asking more specific questions. Was there an adequate incident and breach response strategy in place? Has there been a training program for user security awareness? Were the most modern security tools deployed in the network? Was privileged account management fine-grained enough to prevent far-reaching exploitation of hijacked administrator credentials? And, last but not the least: does the agency have budget for hiring security experts with adequate qualifications for running such a critical environment?

    Unfortunately, very few details about the breach are currently known, but judging by the outcome of the attack, the answer for most of these questions would be “no”. German government agencies are also known for being quite frugal with regards to IT salaries, so the best experts are inevitably going elsewhere.

    Another question that I cannot but think about is what if the hackers have utilized one of the zero-day vulnerability exploits that the German intelligence agency BND is known to have purchased for their own covert operations? That would be a perfect example of “karmic justice”.

    Speaking of concrete advice, KuppingerCole provides a lot of relevant research documents. You should probably start with the recently published free Leadership Brief: 10 Security Mistakes That Every CISO Must Avoid and then dive deeper into specific topics like IAM & Privilege Management in the research area of our website. Our live webinars, as well as recordings from past events can also provide a good introduction into relevant security topics. If you are looking for further support, do not hesitate to talk to us directly!



  • KuppingerCole Analysts' View on User Empowerment / Life Management

    When talking about user empowerment, we are talking about enabling the user to control their data. When looking at the fundamental concept we have outlined initially back in 2012 as Life Management Platforms (there is an updated version available, dating late 2013), this includes the ability of sharing data with other parties in a controlled way. It furthermore is built on the idea on having a centralized repository for personal information – at least logically centralized, physically it might be distributed.



  • Sep 01, 2015: Vulnerability Assessment 2.0: Improving Accuracy and Reducing Costs with Behavior Analysis
    Vulnerability scanners and management tools have been an important part of every information security specialist’s arsenal for decades. Nowadays, with the continued erosion of corporate perimeters and overwhelming increase in advanced targeted attacks exploiting known and unknown vulnerabilities, they are more important than ever before. Learn more about the emerging new generation of vulnerability assessment tools, which focus on clear and concise actionable reports instead of raw detection logs, providing considerable time and cost savings for your security team.

  • Ground Control to Major CRO: Is Identity Governance a Risky Experience?
    In today’s fast changing world the digitalization of businesses is essential to keep pace. The new ABC – Agile Businesses Connected – is the new paradigm organizations must follow. They must connect to their customers, partners and associates. They must become agile to respond to the changing needs of the market. They must understand, manage, and mitigate the risks in this connected world. One important aspect of this is the governance of the ever-increasing number of identities – customers, things, together with their access.



  • Executive View: Axiomatics Policy Management Suite - 70895

    by Graham Williamson

    An enterprise-grade policy administration tool for managing access control policies in the Axiomatics product suite.



  • Executive View: Oracle Privileged Account Manager - 71057

    by Alexei Balaganski

    Oracle Privileged Account Management (OPAM) is a secure password management solution for generating, provisioning and controlling access to privileged account credentials, as well as administrative session management and recording. It is one of the key components of the Oracle Identity Governance suite.